The Joy of Research: The Fae… Dewas

I thought over the next few weeks I would share some of the types of Fae that will appear on the website, particularly those that will either have an important role in the novel Natural Rebirth, or will be important to the Daughters of the Goddess series itself. Those of you familiar with the series, or at least the first book, as well as some of my other novels and stories, you’ll know that Natural Order is set about 13 years or more before everything else. That is because the event crucial to the future of the magical races happens in the series. So far readers have got to know the Clan/Shifter through Natural Order, and the Conclave/Magi through Ancestral Magic. Outside of a novella that will be available sometime next year in my free fiction section, Natural Rebirth will be readers first introduction to the Fae as they appear in the mythology of the Guardian Circle. For that reason I thought I should start with introducing the fairies that are to be Elizabeth’s first experience with the Fae folk as well (at least the first she remembers *wink*). Keep in mind, there are thousands of different types of dewas they go by many different names across countless cultures. These are just a few.

Dewas ~ Are normally seen as nature spirits connected to particular plants, but in the case of the mythos I am building within the world of the Guardian circle dewas are spirits also relating to other aspects of nature as well. Many dewas can assume a human -sized form, as well as a smaller form with wings. In the novel Natural Rebirth, Elizabeth’s first interaction with Fae folk on the Archiquette farm are a trio of flower dewas. Flower dewas are born within a particular type of flower, and take on qualities of that plant.

Blight dewas ~ are one of the fairies to bring in winter and with it decline, disease, and death. Blight dewas punish humans who disrespect the Fae with their powers of disease and sickness.

Dawn dewas ~ are fairies of pure light, who are drawn to people of good hearts way down by doubt. They exude confidence and comfort, which they share with those they see as worthy of their gifts.

Farralis ~ Fire fairy associated with summer. A spirit of courage with the power to destroy or rejuvenate, and without whom fire cannot be started

Primrose dewas ~ are best known for being messengers of the Fae queens. They have a gift for obfuscation as well is as revealing that which has been hidden. One example of this is the use of primroses to allow someone to see fairies.

Vervain dewas ~ are mystics of the Fae kin, and tend to prefer a solitary life outside of fae politics. While vervain fairies are sometimes used by the Fae courts and noble houses to hex humans they can also be entreated to remove unfriendly magics or to protect humans from those types of magics. They often pose as solitary living wise women and have particular gifts when it comes to spells that affect weather.

Wood Wives ~ German Forest fairies, small and dressed in clothing made of leaves. They are kind to those who treat them with respect. Hunter must offer them part of their catch to keep them appeased, and they are attracted to the smell of baking bread so cooks are advised to bake an extra loaf in case they decide to pay a visit. They will pay the cook with sticks or would chips that later turn to gold. Wood wives have a deep connection to the forest and it said with every tree felled a wood wife dies.

Author’s Note: and here are the dewas Elizabeth meets in Natural Rebirth

Táohuā is a peach blossom dewas, and serves as guardian of the peach orchard on the farm.

Myosotis is a dewas of the forget-me-not and serves as keeper of the memorials placed to honor family members who have walked on and their graves.

Hyoscya is a dewas of the henbane plant, so tends to stay close to Greer’s herb garden or to the deep wooded areas on the farm.

They, as do many of the nature spirits that inhabit the Archiquette farm, also watch over the family children, especially four-year-old Sanura.

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